CFP: Manchu in Global History

CFP: Manchu in Global History

Manchu in Global History: A Research Language for Qing Historians Keynote Lecture: Prof. Mark Elliott (Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and Department of History, Harvard University) As an ‘ethnic minority’ with origins in the semi-nomadic civilisations of northeast Asia (Manchuria), the Manchus successfully ruled Han-dominated China and extended the territory of the “Great Qing” (1636/1644-1912) far into Inner Asia, including Mongolia, Tibet, and East Turkestan (Xinjiang). Thereby, they created a wide corridor,...

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Annual Meeting

Annual Meeting

MSG hopes that those of you attending AAS in Toronto will join us for our annual meeting. Although this is mostly a meeting where we cover the business of our organization, it’s a wonderful place to connect with other scholars interested in all aspects of Manchu studies. There meeting will be: Saturday March 18, 1-2.30 pm, Huron, 2nd Floor.   See you there!  

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Call for AAS Proposals

Call for AAS Proposals

Planning to Propose a Manchu-Related Panel for the AAS 2016 Annual Conference? Read On! In anticipation of the 2017 Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference (March 16 – March 19 2017, Toronto, Canada), the Manchu Studies Group (MSG) solicits panel proposals for possible MSG sponsorship. Panels should be focused on some aspect of Manchu studies, broadly conceived. Proposals should include a panel title and abstract, the names of all presenters and the titles of the papers that they plan to deliver, and contact information for the...

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Panels at AAS

Panels at AAS

This year the Manchu Studies Group is sponsoring two panels at the AAS They are: #159: “The Qing Bannermen and Their Everyday Life,” meeting on Friday between 5:15 PM and 7:15 PM in Room 611, which has the following papers: 1.”The Language of Sustenance: Making a Living as a Manchu Tutor in Nineteenth-Century Beijing” Bingyu Zheng, Princeton University 2. “On the Road: Understandings and Experiences of the Road by ManchuBannermen in Qing China” Huiying Chen, University of Illinois at Chicago 3....

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Blog Away!

Blog Away!

Dear gucuse, It’s been a while since our blog has been active, but with a new board (Carla Nappi, President; Max Oidtmann, Secretary; Devin Fitzgerald, (still) Website editor; and Matthew Mosca and Benjamin Levey, (still) Editors of Saksaha), we’re excited to head in new directions. If you’re interested in posting to the blog, please send an email with your proposal to devinfitz AT gmail. Now, you’re probably wondering, what sort of things are good for the blog? Well, with the success of Saksaha, we’d like to...

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Call for Proposals

Call for Proposals

Planning to Propose a Manchu-Related Panel for the AAS 2016 Annual Conference? Read On! In anticipation of the 2016 Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference (March 31 – April 3 2016, Seattle, WA), the Manchu Studies Group (MSG) solicits panel proposals for possible MSG sponsorship. Panels should be focused on some aspect of Manchu studies, broadly conceived. Proposals should include a panel title and abstract, the names of all presenters and the titles of the papers that they plan to deliver, and contact information for the panel...

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Panels at AAS Chicago

Panels at AAS Chicago

MSG Members and/or Panels of Interest at the 2015 AAS meeting in Chicago This is a list (arranged alphabetically) we have drafted to help those with an interest in Manchu studies locate related panels at AAS. Apologies if we’ve missed anything! Friday, March 27 Pär Cassel, University of Michigan, “The Failure of a Concept: The Use and Abuse of Sovereignty in Chinese History,” Fri, March 27, 3:15 to 5:15pm, Chicago Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Level 2, Superior A.   Devin Fitzgerald, Harvard University, “Revolution Revisited:...

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Annual Meeting

Annual Meeting

The Manchu Studies Group is happy to announce our annual meeting at the 2015 AAS Annual Conference, taking place in Chicago, Illinois, March 26-March 29, 2015. Meeting Location: Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers 301 East North Water Street Chicago, Illinois 60611 Meeting/Event Date: Friday, March 27 Time of function 7:30pm – 9:30pm This meeting is open to the public, and we encourage everyone with interest in Manchu studies to attend. The agenda of this year’s meeting includes: Election of new officers Saksaha MSG-sponsored panel for...

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The New Saksaha

The New Saksaha

This December marked the re-release of Saksaha: A Journal of Manchu Studies. This has been a long time in the making, and we here at MSG are excited by the vision of its editors, Benjamin Levey and Matthew W. Mosca. The first issue marks a new direction for the journal. But rather than writing about it, I invite you to browse the newest issues at http://www.saksaha.org/ The editors are actively seeking contributions, so if you have anything you think would fit, please take a look at the submission guidelines and style sheet...

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Notes from the Archives: The First Historical Archives of China

Notes from the Archives: The First Historical Archives of China

David Porter Ph.D. Candidate, Harvard University I spent two months this summer at the First Historical Archives in Beijing. This post is intended to provide a few updates on Macabe Keliher’s superbly informative review of the FHA for Dissertation Reviews and a bit of information about using the archives to look at Manchu documents. Before I get to the practicalities, though, I’d like to encourage readers to take a look at my post (also at MSG), dealing with one of the documents I found in the archives, as an example of the treasures...

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New issue of Manzokushi kenkyū is out

We have just received the latest issue of Manzokushi kenkyū 『満族史研究』(Volume 12, December 2013).  As many readers will know, the journal began in 1991 as Manzokushi kenkyū tsūshin, and “graduated” from newsletter status in 2001, under founding editor Kusunoki Yoshimichi 楠木賢道.  Now under the editorship of Sugiyama Kiyohiko 杉山清彦 of the University of Tokyo, the journal, published by the Japanese Association for Manchu and Qing Studies (満族史研究会) continues to provide a tremendously valuable assortment...

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Altaic Storytelling

Altaic Storytelling

MSG is lucky enough to receive regular updates from Bruce Humes, author of the blog Altaic Storytelling. He recently sent us a few items of note. First, there is good news about the preservation of Sibe language. The China Xibe Language and Culture Research Center in Ili, Xinjiang, has announced that it will soon begin systematically recording speakers of this Tungusic tongue (锡伯语言数字化). This is part of the national “Chinese Language Audio Database Project” (中国语言资源有声数据库工程) inaugurated in 2008...

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Annual Meeting

Annual Meeting

Dear friends, The Manchu Studies Group would like you invite you all to participate in our annual meeting at the Association for Asian Studies. This meeting provides an opportunity for us to gather and discuss the direction of MSG, and provides a great forum for the executive committee to listen to your suggestions and comments.   Meeting Location: Philadelphia Downtown Marriott, 1201 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107 Meeting/Event Date: Friday, March 28, 2014 Room assignment: Meeting Room 411 Time of function: 7:30pm...

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Xinjiang’s Xibe Authors

Xinjiang’s Xibe Authors

Xinjiang’s Xibe Authors: Inspired by “Language of Exile” that has Outlived Manchu Ironically, thanks perhaps to a centuries-old separation from its origins in northeast Asia, the Xibe language (锡伯语)—closely related to Manchu, the language of the Qing Dynasty rulers—remains a living language in modern-day northwest Xinjiang. Most Xibe are concentrated in Qapqal Xibe Autonomous County, descendants of Manchu soldiers first dispatched in 1764 from Shenyang, Liaoning to garrison the frontier. Unlike Manchu, a threatened language...

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MSG Interview: Evelyn Rawski

MSG Interview: Evelyn Rawski

MSG is pleased to have had the opportunity to ask Evelyn Rawski, University Professor at the University of Pittsburgh, a few questions about her career as a historian of Qing China. We hope that you enjoy reading her answers as much as we did! For more information on her many contributions to the field, you can visit her faculty profile here. MSG: Looking at your career, one is immediately struck by the breadth of your interests. You wrote your first two books on economic and social history (AgriculturalChange and the Peasant Economy of South...

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How much decline?

How much decline?

A recent article from PRI entitled “The Manchus ruled China into the 20th century, but their language is nearly extinct” describes the gradual decline of the Manchu language in China. What do you think? Is this article on the mark? Or is there hope for Manchu?

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Back from Vacation

Back from Vacation

Greetings gucuse! MSG has returned from our summer hiatus.  This autumn will be a period of major development. Back issues of Saksaha will finally arrive on the website and an official announcement about the new journal will be released. We are in the process of lining up our blog posts for the next few months, but the materials we already have promise a year of very exciting posts. Here is a preview of some of our new blog topics: Manchu-Uighur translations Manchu poetry An interview with Evelyn Rawski, University Professor –...

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Summer Vacation

Summer Vacation

Now that summer is here, members of the Manchu Studies Group are scattering to the archives (or Rehe) for various research projects. This means that our blog will be on vacation until the beginning of the fall semester. We have a number of posts already lined up for September, and we cannot wait to share some of the exciting materials that have made it into our in-box. Even as the blog takes a hiatus,  big changes will be coming to the Manchu Studies Group website. This summer we will write brief introductions to libraries with digital...

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April in Review

April in Review

The end of the semester always makes April pass by too quickly. If you find yourself with any extra time, we hope you can peruse our blog offerings from the past month. We began April with a fascinating post by David Bropy on Nushirvan Yavshef’s journey to the Ili river valley, where he found himself “A Tartar among the Tartars.” His account is full of interesting details about Sibe reading habits and material conditions. Next, Mario Cams brought us across Eurasia to travel with maps produced in Lakcaha jecen de takūraha...

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MSG Interview: Stephen Wadley

MSG Interview: Stephen Wadley

Now that the last print issue of Saksaha has been released, MSG sat down (virtually) with its former editor, Stephen Wadley, Professor of Chinese at Portland State University, to learn about the history of the journal.  The is the first of many interviews to come, and we are especially thankful to Dr. Wadley for taking the time to thoughtfully respond to our rather eclectic set of questions.   MSG: What made you interested in the study of Manchu? SW: I kind of fell into the study of Manchu.  When I was studying Chinese as an...

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Manchu Books Online: HYL

Manchu Books Online: HYL

As previously announced, the Harvard-Yenching Library is currently digitizing many of the rare books in its Manchu and Mongolian collections. A few interesting books are already available. Of these eleven texts, one highlight is the heavily annotated copy of the 1792 Ilan hacin-i gisun kamcibuha tuwara de ja obuha bithe, otherwise known by its Chinese title, Sanhe bianlan 三合便覽 (A Trilingual Glossary for Convenient Browsing) by Ging-jai (Jing-zhai 敬齋).  The preface, by his son Fugiyūn 富俊, is dated 1780.  The Mongolian...

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Saksaha Flies East

Saksaha Flies East

The final printed edition of Saksaha: A Review of Manchu Studies  has arrived. With this final issue (No. 11) of Saksaha in print, we here at MSG are excited to inherit the journal’s great legacy.  Benjamin Levey and Matthew Mosca, the new editors of Saksaha, are busy planning for the next issue. MSG would like to thank Stephen Wadley (Associate Professor of Chinese and International Studies, Portland State University) and the other editors at Saksaha for their significant contributions to the field. We sincerely hope that we are...

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March in Review

March in Review

It was a good month for MSG. In case you missed the news, we had a wonderful inaugural meeting at the Association for Asian Studies in San Diego.  Please visit our earlier post announcing the details. This March we had three wonderful blog posts on MSG. We began the month with Mårten Söderblom Saarela’s exciting investigation into the cost of Manchu dictionaries during the Guangxu period. Mårten is currently writing a dissertation on Manchu dictionaries during the Qing. His post makes us impatient for his final results!  Next,...

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We’re Official

We’re Official

We are proud to announce the official establishment of the Manchu Studies Group! On Thursday March 21, 2013 we held our inaugural meeting in conjunction with the Association for Asian Studies annual conference in San Diego, and we are now formally affiliated with the AAS.  At the meeting we voted on bylaws, elected officers, and discussed the future of the organization and of Manchu studies broadly. If you would like to read our bylaws, they can be found here. Minutes from the meeting are available here. We also would like to congratulate...

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Traumatic Arts

Traumatic Arts

The Asia Society is currently featuring a show entitled “The Artful Recluse: Painting, Poetry, and Politics in Seventeenth-Century China.”  The show features paintings by Ming loyalists produced during the early Qing. “The paintings in this exhibition offer a fascinating glimpse into the private world of these scholar-painters. Deeply affected by the crises of their times, many sought solace in the ancient ideal of withdrawal or reclusion. They retreated either literally or figuratively from serving a court filled with...

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Young Manchus Online

Young Manchus Online

Everyone is aware of the considerable volume of material pertaining to Manchu studies and Manchu culture that is available online, including a number of sites that aim to increase popular interest in Manchu language and history such as Manzu zaixian 满族在线 (Asude bisire Manju), Jixiang Manzu 吉祥满族 (Sain sabingga Manju), Manzu ernü 满族儿女, Manzu wenhuawang 满族文化网, Manzu xin 满族心 (Manju mujilen), and Manzhou wenhua chuanmei 满洲文化传媒.  Recently a group of Beijing high school students, most of them...

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February in Review

February in Review

Dear friends and members, This February saw a flurry of activity at MSG. We are happy to report that the blog is expanding rapidly, and our goal is to post one item per week. To do this, we need your help. We are soliciting blog content from friends and users. Content needn’t be academic. The blog is for anything Manchu related that you would like to share with our community. If you have any ideas, please contact us at manchustudiesgroup (at) gmail.com We began our month with “Manchu as a tool language for European...

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The Manchu-language conquest of Xinjiang

The Manchu-language conquest of Xinjiang

For some time anticipation has been building over the publication of a major collection of Manchu-language documents on Xinjiang, Qingdai Xinjiang Manwen dang’an huibian 《清代新疆满文档案汇编》.  The good news is that this massive collection, drawn from the holdings of the First Historical Archives in Beijing, was published in December 2012, and copies are now beginning to reach US libraries.  The publication of these materials promises to revolutionize the study of Qing Xinjiang. Published by Guangxi Normal University...

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Manchu Roots

Manchu Roots

On January 30, the LA Times reported on the reemergence of Manchu identities in the PRC. To read the full article visit their website.

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PRC Manchu studies at a turning point?

PRC Manchu studies at a turning point?

Two news items from the past year, linked below, suggest that with the oft-reported demise of the last “native speakers” of Manchu in Heilongjiang, new attention is being brought to the problem of training a new generation of Manchu specialists in China.  In one article, senior figures in the field such as Wu Yuanfeng 吴元丰 and Guan Jialu 关嘉禄 are quoted as saying that there is a serious shortage of younger people being groomed to take over the work of collating, organizing, and publishing Manchu-language archives from...

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Why the Manchus Matter

Why the Manchus Matter

An excellent interview with Mark Elliott tells readers why the Manchus are so important for understanding Chinese history: “In the particular case of the Qing we can see pretty clearly that they were inspired both by Chinese notions of what the state ought to be, what the rulers ought to do, or what the proper hierarchies and relationships were, but also by ideas that did not come from within China itself – what we think of as China, or what we call China – but from Inner Asian territories, and from previous states that had managed...

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The New Norman

The New Norman

The publication of Jerry Norman’s A Comprehensive Manchu-English Dictionary — the long-awaited revision of his 1978 Manchu-English Lexicon — is at hand.  Harvard Asia Center Publications announces that this title will be available by the end of January 2013.  Norman, who sadly passed away in July 2012, had been working for many years on this project.  The new Dictionary contains about one-third more entries than the Lexicon, and has extensive notes on pronunciation not found in the...

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Harvard Summer Manchu

Harvard Summer Manchu

The Harvard University Summer School is pleased to offer an intensive one-month introduction to the Manchu language and Manchu studies in summer 2013. The workshop is designed with the needs of the beginner in mind, but is also suitable for those with some previous exposure to literary Manchu (either through coursework or self-study) who would like to refresh their skills. Morning meetings four times a week focus on language and translation; afternoon meetings twice a week provide a survey of primary and secondary sources in Manjuristics....

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Manchu Studies in Korea

Manchu Studies in Korea

A recent article in the Journal of Cultural Interaction in East Asia by Choe Yungchul details the state of Manchu studies in Korea. While the field is still relatively new, Korean materials from the Choson period offer a unique perspective on the study of Manchu culture and society. Check out the full article “Manchu Studies in Korea” online at the journal’s website.

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HYL Digitization Project

HYL Digitization Project

Good news manjurists! The Harvard-Yenching Library has announced that it will begin digitizing the library’s Manchu and Mongolian collections in the near future: “In case that you missed this extremely exciting message, Harvard-Yenching Library will start the digitization project for its collection of the Mongolian books next month. You can expect to see most of the Mongolian books online in Hollis no later than June 2013. After the Mongolian project, we will continue digitizing the Manchu collection, first with 60 titles of the...

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Manchu Takes Note

Manchu Takes Note

A recent conference at Harvard University on note taking and related practices featured a visit to the Harvard-Yenching Library . The visit introduced the exciting world of Manchu manuscripts to a diverse audience. For a full report visit Book History at Harvard.

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